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mRNA

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mRNA Vaccines

 

How mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines Work:

To trigger an immune response, many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies. Not mRNA vaccines. Instead, mRNA vaccines use mRNA created in a laboratory to teach our cells how to make a protein—or even just a piece of a protein—that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. This immune response, which produces antibodies, is what helps protect us from getting sick from that germ in the future.

COVID vaccine:

First, mRNA COVID-19 vaccines are given in the upper arm muscle or upper thigh, depending on the age of who is getting vaccinated. After vaccination, the mRNA will enter the muscle cells. Once inside, they use the cells’ machinery to produce a harmless piece of what is called the spike protein. The spike protein is found on the surface of the virus that causes COVID-19. After the protein piece is made, our cells break down the mRNA and remove it, leaving the body as waste.

Next, our cells display the spike protein piece on their surface. Our immune system recognizes that the protein does not belong there. This triggers our immune system to produce antibodies and activate other immune cells to fight off what it thinks is an infection. This is what your body might do if you got sick with COVID-19.

At the end of the process, our bodies have learned how to help protect against future infection with the virus that causes COVID-19. The benefit is that people get this protection from a vaccine, without ever having to risk the potentially serious consequences of getting sick with COVID-19. Any side effects from getting the vaccine are normal signs the body is building protection.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines/mrna.html

 

As an internationally recognized scientist/physician, Robert Malone MD is noted as the original inventor of mRNA vaccination as a technology, DNA vaccination, and multiple non-viral DNA and RNA/mRNA platform delivery technologies. He holds numerous fundamental domestic and foreign patents in the fields of gene delivery, delivery formulations, and vaccines: including for fundamental DNA and RNA/mRNA vaccine technologies.

He invented the core mRNA vaccine technology platform and has spent much of his career working on vaccine development. He has also had extensive experience in drug repurposing for infectious disease outbreaks.

He has approximately 100 scientific publications with over 12,000 citations of his work (per Google Scholar with an “outstanding” impact factor rating). He has been an invited speaker at over 50 conferences, and has chaired numerous conferences and has sat on or served as chairperson on HHS and DoD committees. He currently sits as a non-voting member on the NIH ACTIV committee, which is tasked with managing clinical research for a variety of drug and antibody treatments for COVID-19.

https://www.rwmalonemd.com

 

For further information about the mRNA vaccine, the following interview with Dr Malone is attached.

https://youtu.be/YbzVaokxQuc

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